Why Do Cool Kids Chose PHP to Build Websites?

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Coach Wei's Blog Here is a question that I have been pondering on and off for quite a while: Why do "cool kids" choose Ruby or PHP to build websites instead of Java? I have to admit that I do not have an answer. Why do I even care? Because I am a Java developer. Like many Java developers, I get along with Java well. Not only the language itself, but the development environments (Eclipse for example), step-by-step debugging helper, wide availability of libraries and code snippets, and the readily accessible information on almost any technical question I may have on Java via Google. Last but not least, I go to JavaOne and see 10,000 people that talk and walk just like me. The other reason that I ponder this question is that  the power of Java is a perfect fit for the areas where websites may need more than markups or scripting, such as middleware logic. PHP and Ruby etc ... (more)

James Gosling: "Java Is Under No Serious Threat From PHP, Ruby or C#"

(March 9, 2006) - "There have been a number of language coming up lately," noted James Gosling today at Sun's World Wide Education & Research Conference in New York City when asked if Java was in any kind of danger from the newcomers. "PHP and Ruby are perfectly fine systems," he continued, "but they are scripting languages and get their power through specialization: they just generate web pages. But none of them attempt any serious breadth in the application domain and they both have really serious scaling and performance problems." The Father of Java then dismissed Microsoft's C# as having had potential, but no longer: "We were afraid they were going to do something really creative - but they're hopelessly focused on one platform." PHP (for example) is able to make things simpler because it's 100% aimed at web pages, Gosling explained. Whereas with Java, he said, ... (more)

CFEclipse: The Developer's IDE, Eclipse For ColdFusion

Many paths lead developers to ColdFusion. In the past ColdFusion was often viewed as an entry-level language enabling designers and other nonprogrammers to build dynamic sites. Since the release of CFMX it has become more recognized among developers familiar with languages such as Java and PHP. This is partly due to language enhancements such as CFCs, and partly because it now runs as a Web application on top of a J2EE servlet container, thus allowing it to be used to develop the presentation layer for complex J2EE applications. For both types of developers there are requirements that an IDE must support. Many Web development tools are geared toward the first type of users mentioned above. They include features such as WYSIWYG Design Mode and image mapping functionality. For many developers falling into the second category, the WYSIWYG tools are lacking in the featur... (more)

Exclusive Q&A with Jeff Haynie, Co-Founder & CEO, Appcelerator

"Companies have invested a significant amount of money in SOA – and continue to do so," says Jeff Haynie, Co-Founder & CEO of Appcelerator, in this exclusive Q&A with SYS-CON's AJAX & RIA Journal in the run-up to Appcelerator's session on October 20 at AJAX World RIA Conference & Expo in San Jose, California (October 20-22, 2008). "One of the keys to unlocking the full return on investment in SOA is the ability to build service-oriented UIs (SOUIs) – clients designed to consume services, regardless of language or platform," Haynie continues. "We believe Appcelerator's approach truly zeros in on the need for a clean separation of the application from services in an agile development model," he adds. Read the interiew in full below... About Jeff Haynie Jeff Haynie is co-founder and CEO of Appcelerator, an open source software company that develops products and services... (more)

Java Kicks Ruby on Rails in the Butt

This article tries to demonstrate that Java can be more productive than Ruby. We are going to develop the same application of the article Rolling with Ruby on Rails Revisited (part 1 [1] and part 2 [2]) but using POJO [3]s annotated with JPA [4] and a Model Driven Framework, OpenXava [5] in this case. The result is that with less code, and less time you obtain a more powerful application. Ruby and rails: The regressive framework Ruby on rails [6] is so elegant, so easy, so productive. I cannot avoid read and heard continuously these comments. For example, the article Rolling with Ruby on Rails Revisited of Bill Walton says: “What would you think if I told you that you can develop a web application at least ten times faster with Rails than you can with a typical Java framework?” Oops! Ten times faster! Well, after these comments I decided to learn Ruby on Rails. I ne... (more)

Java Feature — What Is SCA?

Service Component Architecture (SCA) is a simple model for creating service-oriented applications. This article highlights the benefits of SCA and introduces SCA concepts by walking through an example. The example has been developed using the Apache Tuscany open source project (http://incubator.apache.org/tuscany/). All the sample code in this article is licensed under the Apache License 2.0 (www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0) and the resources with the article gives a link to the sample files. Both the Apache Tuscany and PHP SCA_SDO (http://pecl.php.net/package/sca_sdo) projects provide a free service oriented infrastructure for creating, packaging, deploying, and managing applications built with the SCA programming model. The SCA programming model itself is described by a set of specifications that are being developed by many vendors and individuals contributin... (more)

An In-Depth Look At The Zend Certified Engineer (ZCE) Certification

Welcome to my first installment as a LinuxWorld Magazine writer. I'm taking over from my colleague Rob Jones and I hope to continue on the same track of providing information on certifications, as well as discussing the nuances in the Linux/Open Source recruiting landscape. For this article, I decided to focus on one of the relatively new Open Source certifications that are permeating the marketplace: the ZCE, or Zend Certified Engineer, based on the popular PHP language from Zend, the PHP company. As the use of PHP in the enterprise grows, it's only natural that certification go along with it, as with ZCE. Since it's less than a year old, I decided to take a different approach than in the past. I figured it would be best to go directly to the source of the most accurate information on it and its relevance in the marketplace. So I did a brief e-mail interview with D... (more)

AJAX and Atlas

One of the big buzzwords that rose to fame in 2005 was "Ajax." The term "Ajax" was first coined by Jesse James Garrett in his essay "Ajax: A New Approach to Web Applications" (www.adaptivepath.com/publications/essays/archives/000385.php), and it refers to the use of asynchronous JavaScript and XML to drive Web applications. Rather than reloading the entire Web page every time data needs to be transmitted, only small, necessary chunks are sent and received, with JavaScript manipulating the UI in response to the data received. This gives the look and feel of a regular client application while still being hosted inside of your Web browser. While Ajax methodologies have been used for years - most notably in Microsoft's Outlook Web Access - they have just recently become incredibly popular via services such Google's Gmail and Google Maps. Since Ajax has taken off among ... (more)

Open Source Database Special Feature: An Introduction to Berkeley DB XML

In this article I am going to introduce you to the latest version of the Berkeley DB XML, version 2.2.8. Berkeley DB XML (BDB XML) is built on top of the well-known Berkeley Database (BDB). BDB XML is an open source, native XML database. Like its ancestor, BDB, it's an embedded database. It provides APIs for the Java, C++, Perl, Python, PHP, and Tcl languages. It supports the popular XML query languages XQuery and XPath 2.0. I will show you how to use BDB XML in two ways. This month I will introduce the BDB XML shell, and next month we will explore using BDB XML with Java. BDB XML has a lot of features, and I will try to cover the most important ones. What's an Embedded Database? Some of you may be familiar with embedded databases. An embedded database runs within another program. It is not a stand-alone server such as Oracle, DB2, or eXist. It is the programmer's re... (more)

Taking Linux, Apache, PostgreSQL, and PHP to Their Logical Extreme

Let's play word association. I say "Web Hosting." I bet "fat margins" didn't jump into your head. More likely, you thought of some of the "where are they nows" of the bubble, like Exodus and PSINet. Let's do another round - I say "New York City," and I'd wager that "cheap rent" wasn't the first thing you thought of, either. So it may surprise you to learn that one hosting company that's been around since 1993 and that's actually making money, Logicworks (www.logicworks.net), just happens to be based in New York City. What's their secret? Talk to CEO, Carter Burden, and he'll tell you that they have low customer turnover because of their superb support, and that this also allows them to earn a modest price premium over the competition. One customer raves: "I have been a client of Logicworks for over 6 years. The service has been as close to flawless as anyone has a ri... (more)

Java vs Dynamic Languages: Sun's James Gosling "Didn't Get The Memo," Says Blogger Ryan Tomayko

I’ve been blissfully neglecting to blog for months with the assumption that a large part of our goal was completed. After watching good people like Martin LaMonica and Jon Udell balance out the mainstream tech press with coverage of lessish tools and languages, and having seen forward looking companies like RedMonk inject themselves into the traditional analyst racket with smart, honest, and unignorable critique, and having seen herds of Java luminaries migrate to simpler, more agile tools and languages, and after hearing Bill Gates say that less code was the only metric, and having watched David, Bill, Ian, Adrian, Phillip, Aristotle, Harry, Mark, Mark, Chad, Curt, James and many other extremely talented programmers dismantle all the common hollow arguments for superfluous complexity and replace them with simple methodologies and working code, after all that ... (more)